“Made In America” Means Something

Sure, it’s easy to find an item cheaper every time we want to buy something but if you’re like most, sometimes it’s that one purchase we had to pay full price for that ends up being one of our favorite items.  Why is that?  Is it some form of self-justification for paying the price or was it the act of the splurge that gives us the satisfaction…the thought of treating ourselves to something we had come to deserve?

The truth may be the hardest thing to swallow.  Could it be that after owning it a little while, we actually realized it was more than worth the price we paid for it?  While foreign markets are loading the shelves with lower priced items, they are also lowering our standards of quality.  It’s like a tsunami and the rippling effects are costing us more than the dollars we are saving.

The furniture industry is no stranger to out-sourcing production to countries where employees are paid only a few dollars a day, where there are no insurance or retirement plans, there are no unions, and for the most part, there is little concern for the materials or safety used to get the job done.  And if you need customer service, well…it’s non-existent.  As a result, some of these manufacturers have grown by leaps and bounds while terminating most of their employees and abandoning their American factories.  How would you feel if you found out that your retirement fund owned stock in an American company who eliminated any chance of retirement for hundreds, if not thousands of American families?

Make no mistake.  American-made quality is like no other.  And there’s nothing better than treating ourselves to that quality whenever possible.  Thankfully, some American furniture manufacturers have taken a strong position in preserving this quality for those who can appreciate it and understand it.

One of the foremost furniture manufacturers that comes to mind is EJVictor.  Based in Morganton, North Carolina, they represent a tradition of very high quality, hand-made casegoods and upholstery items.  After doing business with them over the past 18 years, I can honestly say that no details or materials are spared to ensure that their product is second to none.  And their customer service is not just a department…it’s their method of business.   While others are pumping out stamped carvings or turnings, EJVictor is painstakingly producing theirs the old fashioned way…one piece at a time…using the talents of many second or third  generation furniture builders who are still practicing the art of craftsmanship.  One look and feel is enough to convince you of the difference.

Pieces of furniture that are made this way are the treasures of tomorrow.   They are the pieces that last a lifetime, and then some.   And yes, they cost a little more.  But they are also better designed, of higher quality, have finer finishes, offer more flexibility and will no doubt become one of those of favorite pieces that you made a splurge on.  And yes, you probably deserve it.

You’ll also have the added pleasure of knowing every dollar you spend on it, from the manufacturer, to the trucking company to the retail dealer, will be kept here at home to benefit all of us as a whole.

It’s just one more way you can make a difference in helping our country get back on its feet and own a piece of American quality.

 

Visit EJVictor’s site by clicking here

2 thoughts on ““Made In America” Means Something

  1. I applaud you for writing this most impressive article! I worked for many years for one of the manufacturers that has out-sourced Most of their product and is now paying for this decision. Plants closed, many people lost their jobs and the manufacturer lost its reputation for quality!

    • Thanks, Elizabeth. It’s true and sad. There are so many hard working, talented people right here at home and thankfully some companies are realizing that foreign production comes with more problems than it’s worth. When I go to High Point it’s always exciting to see new companies emerge but it’s also heartbreaking to see empty factories where a once thriving, successful company had made its home. It makes me think about all the people who worked there and the dreams they saw slowly slip away.